1 In 6 New Medical Specialists Say They Can’t Find Work

Canada to Host World’s Medical Specialists

Slower job growth for specialists as the health-care system in some cases substitutes other health professionals such as nurse practitioners and physician assistants for physicians. Established specialists may also be reluctant to share resources such as operating room time. Lack of adequate career counselling and personal choices about type and location of practice when new graduates have family responsibilities why not look here (spousal employment, caring for children or elderly parents) that make it harder to move to job opportunities. Half of respondents in 2012 said they hadn’t received any careercounselling. Dr. Christine Herman is a recently trained cardiac surgeon. She is like about 31 per cent of new specialists who said they chose not to enter the job market but instead pursued more training, which they hoped would make them more employable. Herman said medical schools and the provinces and territories need to do a better job of workforce planning. “I think that the training programs aren’t in sync with the needs that are out there,” Herman said. “Long-term planning, committee planning for job availability is needed.” Steven Lewis, a health policy consultant based in Saskatchewan who was not involved in the study, thinks the situation willworsen. “I think that there is no question that … almost doubling medical school enrolments since the late 1990s combined with easier paths to licensure for international medical grads was the wrong thing to do. We didn’t think it through as a country.” Just under 20 per cent of recently certified specialists said they’d look for work outside of Canada, which could promote a “brain drain” to the U.S., the report’s authors said.
1 in 6 new medical specialists say they can’t find work

Medical specialists still needed in northwestern Ont.

Dr. Roger Strasser

So why couldnt this young fellow find a job? The troubling new trend of unemployed and underemployed specialist doctors is a growing problem that medical organizations across the country are scrambling to figure out. One in six specialists who finished training this year did not find jobs, even in high-demand fields plagued by extensive wait times. Suspected causes include delayed retirement of older doctors, flawed workforce planning and hospital budget constraints that restrict the expansion of certain departments. But an opinion piece published Thursday in the online magazine Healthy Debate argues that unemployed young doctors are a symptom of a much larger problem. The issue in some hospitals, the piece argues, is that senior doctors have been given control over recruiting new physicians or choosing not to. This has created a disturbing potential for conflict of interest, writes Dr. Robert Bear, a former University of Toronto professor who now works as a health-care consultant. In many specialties, a hospital physicians annual income depends on the number of colleagues he or she shares patients with the more doctors in a department, the less each one earns through government billing. As a result, even in departments where there might be room to hire, Bear says some choose not to. Partners in some small nephrology departments at Ontario community hospitals admit they are run off their feet, Bear writes. Meanwhile, others lessen the workload by hiring recently graduated nephrologists as associates, paying them salaries far lower than they would earn as full partners. Its not that doctors are bad, and its not that theyre not skilled or caring or compassionate, Bear said in an interview with the Star.
http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2012/11/15/healthcare_checkup_why_cant_newly_graduated_specialist_doctors_in_canada_find_jobs.html

Health-care checkup: Why can’t newly graduated specialist doctors in Canada find jobs?

(Yvon Theriault/CBC) Last week, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada reported that one-in-sixnewlycertified medical graduatesin Canada say they can’t find a position in their specialty areas. But NOSM dean Roger Strassersaid the study was limited in scope and the findings were only broken down to a provincial level. They did not examine the supply and demand of medical specialists in specific regions like northwestern Ontario. “I think it’s important when you look at the study not to jump to conclusions,” he told CBC News, addingthe study doesn’t consider how the demand for various types of specialized medicine might change in the future. Strasser said medical specialists who have the most difficulty finding jobs are likely located in other larger urban centresin the province. Dr. Stewart Kennedy, executive vice-president of academic and medical affairs at Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre, agreed. Dr. Stewart Kennedy, executive vice-president of academic and medical affairs at Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre, says northwestern Ontario is finally gaining much-needed medical specialists. (Nicole Ireland/CBC) “Sometimes [specialists are] unable to find a position in a locality that they want,” Kennedy said. “So I think we really have to look at the distribution of physicians [geographically].” ‘Advantage’ in northwestern Ontario Kennedy said NOSMis accomplishing its goalto graduate much-needed physicians and specialists to work at the hospital and in the region. “We had challenges with human resources for a good number of years,” he said. “We have increased medical student enrolmentby … 40 or 50 per cent over the past eight years, because we’ve had such shortages,” he said. “It’s playing to our advantage in northwestern Ontario because we are able to recruit top, talented doctors [who], at one point … always wanted to stay in an academic centre in eastern Ontario.” Strasser saidthe Royal College report shows the need for better medical workforce planning at the national level to ensure doctors are trained in the specialties where there is projected demand,and available to work in the geographic areas where they are needed. “It’s really looking to plan for and ensure the supply of the right physicians with the right skills in the right places …
Medical specialists still needed in northwestern Ont.

Surgical team in operating room

The beautiful city of Vancouver, B.C. will welcome the world’s dermatology community as it hosts the 23rd World Congress of Dermatology in 2015. The Canadian Dermatology Association is delighted by the announcement that delegates at the 22nd World Congress of Dermatology (WCD) in Seoul voted to see the largest conference of dermatologic specialists come to Canada. Other locations that were in the running to the host the 23rd WCD included Rome, Vienna, Istanbul and Bangalore. “The Vancouver Bid Committee has worked tirelessly over the last three years attending countless dermatology meetings and strengthening international relationships in order to put a face to the Canadian bid,” says Dr Ian Landells, CDA President. The theme for the Vancouver WCD will be A Global Celebration of Dermatology and will mark the first time the conference has ever been held in Canada. To encourage participation from dermatologists around the globe, the Committee established a comprehensive scholarship program targeted at dermatologists and trainees from developing countries who might otherwise be unable to attend. “Vancouver is a dynamic, multicultural city in a spectacular natural environment and we’re honoured our colleagues around the world elected to use it as the setting for the 2015 World Congress of Dermatology,” says Dr Jerry Shapiro, Vancouver Bid Committee President. Canada’s dermatologists and their supporters will be taking time to celebrate this well-earned victory at the WCD Gala in Seoul before returning home to begin planning for the 2015 WCD. About CDA The Canadian Dermatology Association, founded in 1925, represents Canadian dermatologists. The association exists to advance the science and art of medicine and surgery related to the health of the skin, hair and nails; provide continuing professional development for its members; support and advance patient care; provide public education on sun protection and other aspects of skin health; and promote a lifetime of healthy skin, hair and nails. For further information:
Canada to Host World’s Medical Specialists

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